EDL

 

 

 

 

 

 

         

 

 

Staff Development

 

 

    

Sample Presentations:

Learning & Diversity:  Research-Based Strategies

  Autism
  Early Childhood
  Discipline
  Diverse Learners
  Additional Topics                              

Autism

Filling in the Puzzle: 

Supporting Students with Autism in the General Education Setting

  

In order to address the specific needs of students with autism spectrum disorders [ASD], a comprehensive and structured approach is necessary to bridge the communication gap and provide a meaningful education. This session will explore the visual strategies necessary for students with ASD to experience success cognitively, socially and behaviorally. By blending structured teaching into a sound instructional environment, educators can address specific needs while holding high expectations.

Preventing and Minimizing Challenging Behaviors:

Understanding expectations, holding the power of communication and having choices are several of the most effective strategies to prevent inappropriate behaviors. This session will focus on prevention with an emphasis on redirection in order to minimize stereotypic or self-injurious behaviors.

Strategies for Working with Young Children with Autism

In order to address the specific needs of young children with autism, a comprehensive and structured approach is necessary to bridge the communication gap and provide a meaningful education. This session will explore the visual strategies necessary for children with autism to experience success cognitively, socially and behaviorally. By blending structured teaching into a developmentally appropriate preschool environment, educators can address specific needs while holding high expectations for all students.

Creating and Revising Schedules

One of the fundamental strategies necessary for students with autism spectrum disorders to orient themselves and anticipate upcoming events is a visual, concrete schedule of daily and/or weekly activities.  This session will not only address the considerations in creating an effective schedule, but also the steps to revise the schedule based on student performance and needs. 


In-Home Training

A critical aspect of addressing the educational needs of students with autism spectrum disorders is In-Home Training.  As one of the seven components of the Individual Education Plan [IEP] supplement, educators must provide a seamless  structure between home and school in order to maximize educational benefit for the student.  This session will provide strategies and tools to develop qualified staff to implement effective In-Home training.

Visually Speaking Supporting Students with Autism Through Structured Teaching TM

This four-day training provides an intensified look at the principles of structured teaching in order to maximize the success of students with autism in current and future environments. The outcomes for each day are as follows:

Day 1:  Participants will create a learning environment from an empty room in order to prepare for the arrival of students on Day 2. Teaching teams will strategize to develop physical structure, concrete schedules and mini-schedules based on student profiles. Final preparations will focus on creating structured activities for instructional purposes.

Day 2:  Participants will trouble shoot the visual structure that has been created based upon student performance and develop a plan for the development of communication skills.

Day 3:  Participants will continue to refine the visual structure based on assessment of the communication activities. The bridge between communication and behavior will lead us to the next topic of social skill development.

Day 4:  Participants will evaluate the effectiveness of their efforts throughout the week and develop plans for specific students. This final session will also focus on the incorporation of structured teaching into general education settings.

Examples of structured tasks developed at the Visually Speaking training are located in the Resources section.

 

Early Childhood

Creating Centers for Success and Independence

The classroom environment sets the stage for not only what we learn in an instructional setting, but also how we learn. Are children encouraged to move, communicate and explore in creative ways? Are parents and families welcomed and valued? Are differences celebrated? Can learning be fun? Most of these critical questions can be answered by the room arrangement, the décor, materials, and outdoor environments. This session will help teachers to make       decisions about how to develop centers that foster creativity, independence, cognitive and social development in very purposeful and motivating ways.

Music and Movement

Large group activities hold great promise for teaching important skills for young children.  Some of these skills include number concepts, phonological awareness and social interaction.  This session will explore strategies for developing large group experiences that are filled with learning and fun for all.

Language and Literacy for Life

This session will take a close look at the phonological awareness continuum in order to purposefully plan for such critical experiences.  By incorporating developmentally sound approaches, children can engage in language and literacy activities while feeling successful and enjoying the reading experience.

Early Childhood Assessment

The area of early childhood assessment is quite vast and can be difficult to navigate. This session will focus on specific instruments that provide meaningful information. Additionally, participants will explore effective methods of data gathering, all for the purpose of informing instructional decisions. A teacher must be able to determine student strengths, needs and interests so as to best support the educational needs of diverse learners. The proper use of assessment data helps educators and parents look to the future in a deliberate fashion while celebrating the successes of young children along the way.

Behavior and Problem Solving

Learning how to behave is as critical for young children as learning how to understand key concepts. Their future will be greatly impacted by their ability to work well with others, make decisions, and manage their own behaviors. This session will focus on strategies that serve to empower young children with these abilities.

Strategies for Working with Young Children with Autism

In order to address the specific needs of young children with autism, a comprehensive and structured approach is necessary to bridge the communication gap and provide a meaningful education. This session will explore the visual strategies necessary for children with autism to experience success cognitively, socially and behaviorally. By blending structured teaching into a developmentally appropriate preschool environment, educators can address specific needs while holding high expectations for all students.

Linking Young Children Together: 

IEP, DAP, AGC and other great acronyms

Preschool programs are rich with activity, language and socialization.  This matches the type of program that special educators strive to develop for students with disabilities.  We have before us a great opportunity to merge resources and capitalize on existing developmentally appropriate settings as educators struggle to meet the individual needs of young children with identified disabilities.  This session will explore the steps necessary to create opportunities for young children with disabilities to experience all kinds of success in the least restrictive environment

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Discipline

Behavior and Problem Solving

Learning how to behave is as critical for young children as learning how to understand key concepts. Their future will be greatly impacted by their ability to work well with others, make decisions, and manage their own behaviors. This session will focus on strategies that serve to empower young children with these abilities.

The Link Between Instruction and Behavior

Classrooms bring together many different personalities, interests and needs.  This combination can lead to conflicts and daily struggles among students and staff alike.  By knowing students' strengths, talents, interests and specific needs, teachers can create instruction that capitalizes on all aspects.  One of the most powerful  keys to preventing behavior difficulties is to engage the learner in motivating, challenging and engaging instruction.  A synthesis of the lesson cycle, multiple intelligences, project- based learning and portfolio assessment can provide such instruction.

School Climate and Behavioral Supports

Positive behavioral supports are a crucial aspect to the comprehensive development of students.  Campuses must come together to develop a system to set expectations, identify procedures and appropriate strategies, and create a culture that reflects a genuine concern for the well being of each student.  This session will examine the processes necessary to develop such systems.

Innovative Discipline

For most of the student population, traditional strategies are found to be effective.  There is a small group of students that seem to require more time and energy in the areas of social and behavioral development.  For these students, this session will focus on different and new ways to deal with old problems.

Restitution

Teaching students to follow rules and expectations has become more and more complex over recent years.  It has evident that traditional consequences hold little value for some students.  If the educational system is to develop character along with academic abilities, then alternative strategies must be considered.  The idea of restitution is a simple one . . . you are to help "make right" what your actions have wronged.  This session will explore this process of learning as it relates to behavior.

 

Diverse Learners

Understanding the Impact of Disabilities

Understanding disabilities leads to a better understanding of the most appropriate instructional strategies to support student needs.  As teachers are faced with new students in new environments, a wider knowledge base of characteristics and classroom implications of different disabilities will serve to inform the educational decision-making process.

Learning and Diversity:  Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement

Many students at the elementary and secondary levels struggle with organizing their learning, which can contribute greatly to  gaps in learning.  Strategies such as taking notes effectively, using advance organizers and other visual tools to organize their thought processes can serve to help bridge those gaps.  This session will further explore differentiated instruction, multiple intelligences and the brain research that explains why they are so important and lead to student success.           

Including Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms

General education and special education teachers are encouraged to attend this session as a team in order to start the planning process for the successful inclusion of students with disabilities across general education environments.  Agenda items will include collaborative teaching models, differentiated instruction, supports and modifications and ongoing evaluation of student and program goals. 

Developing TEKS-Based IEPs

The "No Child Left Behind" Act has emphasized  the need to hold high expectations for all students.  The Individualized Educational Plan (IEP)  is one of the important processes in place to ensure this occurs.  In order to maximize the possibilities, this session will focus on IEPs that are connected to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, the state standards for curricular decisions for all students.  The second half of this training will provide a greater understanding of the critical components of how to formulate measurable goals and objectives that contain a condition, performance behavior, and criteria.

Multiple Intelligences:  Ways of Knowing and Showing

The works of Howard Gardner, Thomas Armstrong and many others provides a framework for embracing and celebrating the different strengths that students bring into the classroom.  By tapping in to the musical, linguistic, spatial, mathematical talents and skills, teachers can begin to formulate instructional plans for teaching that build on just those areas.  Additionally, students may have strengths associated with the following types of learning:  movement, social, self, nature.  Teaching in a way that allows students to learn through their strengths/interests leads to greater student motivation and success. 

Differentiated Instruction

As educators strive to bring students together in the general education setting, challenges arise when students have not only different learning styles, but also varied reading and functioning levels.  Differentiating instruction is a process by which all students can be part of a meaningful learning experience while addressing individual needs.  Topics for this session include collaborative planning, individual goals, assessment and successful differentiation of instruction.

Linking Young Children Together:  IEP, DAP, AGC and other great acronyms

Preschool programs are rich with activity, language and socialization.  This matches the type of program that special educators strive to develop for students with disabilities.  We have before us a great opportunity to merge resources and capitalize on existing developmentally appropriate settings as educators struggle to meet the individual needs of young children with identified disabilities.  This session will explore the steps necessary to create opportunities for young children with disabilities to experience all kinds of success in the least restrictive environment.

PEERS:
Peers Educating and Enriching Relationships through Supports

Classrooms of today need to be able to support the needs of a diverse group of learners.  While modifications and accommodations are a primary consideration in doing just that, an often untapped resource exists in every classroom on every campus . . . peers.  This session will explore strategies to connect learners in academic and social ways, producing benefits for all.

 

More Training Topics

Paraeducators as Members of the Instructional Team

The Lesson Cycle for New Teachers

Mentor Training

Instructional Strategies

Behavioral Supports for At-Risk Students

Motivation:  What is it and how do you get it?

Setting up the Learning Environment

Functional Behavioral Analysis

Collaboration

Parent Involvement

Developing Rubrics

Authentic Assessment

Effective Instruction for Students with Severe Disabilities

 

Contact Lisa Rogers at LisaRogersEDL@aol.com or (210) 867-6826

for staff development tailored to your campus/district needs.

Educating Diverse Learners